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The purpose of this page of the CDDIS web site is to post new items, activities, data sets, etc. of interest to the CDDIS user community. Users should also consult the meetings page to view a list of upcoming meetings and events of interest to the space geodesy community.


Journal of Geodesy Special Issue: "Satellite Laser Ranging" now published
(25 November 2019)

The Journal of Geodesy has recently published the "Special Issue: Satellite Laser Ranging" (Volume 93, Issue 11, November 2019, editors Erricos Pavlis, Vincenza Luceri, Toshimichi Otsubo, Ulrich Schreiber). This issue consists of twenty papers detailing recent developments in SLR:

Preface to the second special issue on Laser Ranging, Pavlis, E.C., Luceri, V., Otsubo, T. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2159. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01305-2

The ILRS: approaching 20 years and planning for the future, Pearlman, M.R., Noll, C.E., Pavlis, E.C. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2161. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01241-1

Laser geodetic satellites: a high-accuracy scientific tool, Pearlman, M., Arnold, D., Davis, M. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2181. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01228-y

Lunar Laser Ranging: a tool for general relativity, lunar geophysics and Earth science, Müller, J., Murphy, T.W., Schreiber, U. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2195. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01296-0

Information resources supporting scientific research for the international laser ranging service, Noll, C.E., Ricklefs, R., Horvath, J. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2211. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1207-2

The next generation of satellite laser ranging systems, Wilkinson, M., Schreiber, U., Procházka, I. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2227. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1196-1

NASA’s satellite laser ranging systems for the twenty-first century, McGarry, J.F., Hoffman, E.D., Degnan, J.J. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2249. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1191-6

Modernizing and expanding the NASA Space Geodesy Network to meet future geodetic requirements, Merkowitz, S.M., Bolotin, S., Elosegui, P. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2263. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1204-5

Future SLR station networks in the framework of simulated multi-technique terrestrial reference frames, Glaser, S., König, R., Neumayer, K.H. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2275. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01256-8

Impact of network constraining on the terrestrial reference frame realization based on SLR observations to LAGEOS, Zajdel, R., Sośnica, K., Drożdżewski, M. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2293. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01307-0

Satellite laser ranging to low Earth orbiters: orbit and network validation, Arnold, D., Montenbruck, O., Hackel, S. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2315. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1140-4

Rapid response quality control service for the laser ranging tracking network, Otsubo, T., Müller, H., Pavlis, E.C. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2335. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1197-0

Transitioning the NASA SLR network to Event Timing Mode for reduced systematics, improved stability and data precision, Varghese, T., Ricklefs, R.L., Pavlis, E.C. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2345. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01326-x

Systematic errors in SLR data and their impact on the ILRS products, Luceri, V., Pirri, M., Rodríguez, J. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2357. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01319-w

Time bias service: analysis and monitoring of satellite orbit prediction quality, Bauer, S. & Steinborn, J. J Geod (2019) 93: 2367. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01304-3

Operating two SLR systems at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell: from local survey to space ties, Riepl, S., Müller, H., Mähler, S. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2379. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01243-z

Time and laser ranging: a window of opportunity for geodesy, navigation, and metrology, Exertier, P., Belli, A., Samain, E. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2389. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1173-8

Laser and radio tracking for planetary science missions—a comparison, Dirkx, D., Procházka, I., Bauer, S. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2405. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1171-x

Assessment of the impact of one-way laser ranging on orbit determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Löcher, A. & Kusche, J. J Geod (2019) 93: 2421. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1200-9

Version of a glass retroreflector satellite with a submillimeter "target error", Sokolov, A.L., Akentyev, A.S., Vasiliev, V.P. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2429. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01260-y

Studies on the materials of LARES 2 satellite, Paolozzi, A., Sindoni, G., Felli, F. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 2437. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01316-z


2019 ILRS Technical Workshop banner

SLR Pioneer Certificates presented by Toshi Otsubo at the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop
(01 November 2019)

During the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop, Toshi Otsubo, chair of the ILRS Governing Board, presented the "SLR Pioneer Certificate" to the following recipients:

Victor Shargorodskiy (Research-and-Production Corporation «Precision Systems and Instruments«/ Moscow, Russia)
"In recognition of his role in the building and deploying of the ROSCOSMOS SLR network"

John McK. Luck (Geoscience Australia, retired/Canberra, Australia)
"In recognition of his work in establishing SLR activities in Australia and Western Pacific Laser Tracking Network"

Carey Noll (NASA GSFC/Greenbelt MD, USA)
"In recognition of her dedication, vision and creativity in supporting all aspects of the ILRS"

At the conclusion of the workshop, a "Recognition of Appreciation" certificate was presented to:

Daniel Hampf (DLR, Stuttgart, Germany)
"In recognition of the outstanding support provided in organizing and hosting the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop, Stuttgart, Germany"

Congratulations to the recipients!


IERS logo

Notice of Pending Shutdown of IERS Rapid Service/Prediction Center web and FTP sites
(22 October 2019)

The U.S. Naval Observatory's Rapid/Service Prediction web/FTP sites (maia.usno.navy.mil and toshi.nofs.navy.mil) must undergo modernization and will be offline starting sometime Thursday, 24 October 2019. The expected completion of work and return of service is estimated as 30 April 2020.

The data products that the IERS Rapid Service/Prediction Center sends to the CDDIS will continue to be sent and they will be available on the CDDIS during the shutdown at:

ftp://cddis.nasa.gov/products/iers/
https://cddis.nasa.gov/archive/products/iers/


CDDIS logo

NASA Earth Science Data and Services Survey for 2019
(08 October 2019)

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, some of you may have received an email from the CFI Group on behalf of NASA. This message asked you to complete a survey for users of NASA Earth science data and services, which includes the Crustal Dynamics Data Information System (CDDIS). The CDDIS is one of twelve NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) science data centers evaluated by this survey. The purpose of this survey is to help NASA and the DAACs assess customer satisfaction and improve future services. Suggestions from past surveys have been implemented to improve the tools and services offered by the CDDIS.

Please participate! Your feedback affects our future performance and helps to identify science needs. You will be able to take the survey for each DAAC you use. This is your opportunity to influence the priorities of the DAACs, including CDDIS.

If you do not receive a survey and wish to complete one or know of someone who uses CDDIS and/or EOSDIS data and services who did not receive a survey, please contact

surveyhelp@cfigroup.com

and provide your e-mail address and the names of the DAACs you use.

The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) is the only national cross-industry measure of customer satisfaction in the United States. NASA commissioned the CFI Group, an independent research and consulting organization, to conduct a brief survey to rate the products and services NASA currently provides from NASA's EOSDIS data centers. Please consider responding to this survey; your input will help us to better serve our user community.

Presentations of these results given to NASA Earth science are available at:

https://earthdata.nasa.gov/about/system-performance/american-customer-satisfaction-index-reports

Thank you in advance to all of you who are willing to spend a few minutes to complete the survey.


Night-time laser ranging at NASA

Space Geodesy helps track effects of global change
(28 August)

A new article in the September 2019 issue of the Smithsonian's Air & Space magazine describes how space geodesy is tracking the effects of global change down to the millimeter. Several NASA researchers were interviewed for the article. CDDIS is NASA's archive for space geodesy data and derived products.

Read the article in Air & Space Magazine.


retroreflectors on the surface of the moon

Reflectors placed on the moon by Apollo 11 astronauts 50 years ago continue to provide fresh lunar laser ranging data
(31 July)

Fifty years ago, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins left behind arrays of prisms that reflect light back toward its source; the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts also did so. Four telescopes at observatories in New Mexico, France, Italy and Germany fire lasers at them, measuring the time that it takes for a laser pulse to bounce off the reflectors and return to Earth. This allows the distance to be measured to within a fraction of an inch (a few millimeters), and scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory analyze the results. Lunar laser ranging measurements have deepened our understanding of the dance between the Moon and Earth.

Read more...


Cover of the Journal of Geodesy

Journal of Geodesy Special Issue on Laser Ranging
(23 July)

The following peer-reviewed Journal of Geodesy articles were recently published online at the journal site. These are all part of the Special Issue on Laser Ranging which is preparation. Several more articles are in the review process and upon completion the printed version will be published.

In the meantime we invite you to peruse all of these with the latest information on Laser Ranging and the ILRS:

Information Resources Supporting Scientific Research for the International Laser Ranging Service, Noll, C.E., Ricklefs, R., Horvath, J. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1207-2

Modernizing and Expanding the NASA Space Geodesy Network to Meet Future Geodetic Requirements, Merkowitz, S.M., Bolotin, S., Elosegui, P. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1204-5

Assessment of the impact of one-way laser ranging on orbit determination of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, Löcher, A. & Kusche, J. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1200-9

Rapid Response Quality Control Service for the Laser Ranging Tracking Network, Otsubo, T., Müller, H., Pavlis, E.C. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1197-0

The Next Generation of Satellite Laser Ranging Systems, Wilkinson, M., Schreiber, U., Procházka, I. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1196-1

NASA's Satellite Laser Ranging Systems for the 21st Century, McGarry, J.F., Hoffman, E.D., Degnan, J.J. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1191-6

Time and laser ranging: A window of opportunity for geodesy, navigation and metrology, Exertier, P., Belli, A., Samain, E. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1173-8

Laser and Radio Tracking for Planetary Science Missions - A Comparison, Dirkx, D., Procházka, I., Bauer, S. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1171-x

Satellite Laser Ranging to Low Earth Orbiters - Orbit and Network Validation, Arnold, D., Montenbruck, O., Hackel, S. et al. J Geod (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1140-4

The ILRS: Approaching 20 years and planning for the future, Pearlman, M.R., Noll, C.E., Pavlis, E.C. et al. J Geod (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01241-1

Laser geodetic satellites: a high‐accuracy scientific tool, Pearlman, M., Arnold, D., Davis, M. et al. J Geod (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01228-y

Future SLR station networks in the framework of simulated multi-technique terrestrial reference frames, Glaser, S., König, R., Neumayer, K.H. et al. J Geod (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01256-8

Operating two SLR systems at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell: from local survey to space ties, Riepl, S., Müller, H., Mähler, S. et al. J Geod (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01243-z

Version of a glass retroreflector satellite with a submillimeter "target error", Sokolov, A.L., Akentyev, A.S., Vasiliev, V.P. et al. J Geod (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-019-01260-y

The SAO and the CNES contributions to the International Laser Ranging Network, Pearlman, M., Brachet, G., Lefebvre, M. et al. J Geod (2019) 93: 869. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00190-018-1209-0


2019 ILRS Workshop Banner

Introductory and Refresher Course on Satellite and Lunar Laser Ranging
(11 July)

The ILRS has scheduled a one-day introductory course to give non-practitioners in SLR an opportunity to broaden their knowledge about laser ranging to Earth-orbiting satellites and the Moon. The course will also provide those with some experience in the field an opportunity to refresh and strengthen their knowledge and increase their appreciation of this powerful measurement technique that supports geoscience and applications. The course is scheduled for Sunday, October 20, 2019, in Stuttgart, Germany, just prior to the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop. The program for this one-day "SLR School" is available.

Talks will be given in a tutorial format, with time for questions and discussion. Interested parties can attend the school with or without participating in the Workshop. Attendees will be charged an entrance fee of 30 Euros to cover lunch and breaks.

Tutorials will differ in length depending on the topic, but each session should leave ample time for questions and discussion. Seminars will be given at the level of a non-expert, recognizing that we expect people to attend who are not currently working in the field, but are curious, as well as people who are newly involved in laser ranging, but need to broadening their current level of understanding.

The one-day SLR School will be a great way for attendees to get an overview of an important component of the space geodesy measurement constellation. Please see the attached PDF for the topics to be covered in the program.

Participants in the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop can indicate their plans to attend the SLR School during registration (see http://dlr.de/ilrs2019). Those wishing to attend only the SLR School should contact the workshop’s local organizing committee (ilrs.workshop@dlr.de); arrangements are being made for payment of the one-day fee.

This one-day event is an opportunity for participants to get an overall view of satellite laser ranging and is the first time that such a school has been offered. The school will be held at the:

Pullman Stuttgart Fontana Hotel
Vollmoellerstraße 5, 70563 Stuttgart, Germany

More Information on hotels, transportation, etc., is available on the workshop website at: http://dlr.de/ilrs2019.


ILRS logo

2019 ILRS Technical Workshop first circular released
(13 May)

The first circular for the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop has been released. The workshop will take place October 21-25 in Stuttgart, Germany.


CDDIS logo

Update to Real-time Data Caster stream names
(16 April 2019)

The CDDIS supports the International GNSS Service Real-Time Service (IGS RTS) and, in accordance with all data providers supporting the IGS RTS, the CDDIS will begin updating data and product streams, lengthening names from 5 to 10 characters, reflecting their RINEX V3 observation file name. For example, stream name ALBH0 will become ALBH00CAN0.

This new nomenclature will be adopted across all casters that participate within the IGS RTS, improving stream name uniqueness, consistency across caster sources, and providing useful information within the name. For example each stream name will contain the mount point name and numbers, the three-character country code, and a number to distinguish formats (RAW versus RTCM, etc.) offered by the same station (it is recommended 0 is used for the best RTCM version 3 format). Using ALBH00CAN0 as an example:

ALBH - monument or mount point name
0 - monument or marker number
0 - receiver number
CAN - the 3 character country code
0 - format-distinguishing number

The CDDIS will be updating stream names throughout this year (2019) and will continue to offer both long and short name stream versions, where available, until the end of this calendar year (December 31, 2019). Starting January 1, 2020 all real-time data and product streams offered at CDDIS will be 10 characters.

Streaming should not be affected and all changes should go unnoticed to end users. After the streams are modified, users should only notice the name of the stream has been updated from 5 to 10 characters. Please contact cddis-help-ntrip@lists.nasa.gov with questions.


CDDIS logo

Update to DORIS RINEX summary files
(11 March 2019)

On March 06, 2019, the CDDIS updated the DORIS RINEX summary files. Originally, the DORIS RINEX summary files contained only the header information. With this update, the summary files now include station-specific information similar to the multiday files: satellite, station, start datetime, end time, and the number of observations.


CDDIS logo

CDDIS Real-Time Infrastructure Down Time - Including Real-Time Caster
(11 March 2019)

On Tuesday, March 12, CDDIS will be upgrading its GNSS real-time infrastructure which includes the Ntrip Caster access. The systems will be down from 1400 – 1600 EDT, 1800 - 2000 UTC.

After the switch to the new system, the system will no longer restrict your access to your requested list of streams. You will be able to access any stream, up to the number of streams you previously requested (i.e., 1, 5, 25, or 50 streams).

Your access to the CDDIS caster will not change. You will continue to use your Earthdata username/password combination. If you need to change your password or forgot your userid or password please go to https://urs.earthdata.nasa.gov/ and follow the instructions.

After 1600 EDT, 2000 UTC, if you cannot access the caster, please send an email to cddis-help-ntrip@lists.nasa.gov and we will help you.


ILRS logo

Planning for the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop has begun
(12 February 2019)

Planning for the 2019 ILRS Technical Workshop has begun! We ask that you mark your calendars and reserve the date for the next gathering of the ILRS community:

Dates: October 21-25, 2019
Location: Stuttgart, Germany

The workshop will be sponsored by the DLR in Stuttgart, Germany. The program committee is actively working on the defining the theme and session topics for the workshop while the local organizers are planning the workshop logistics.

The first circular for the workshop will be issued in the very near future.

We hope you will consider attending the workshop!


Laser beam pointed at the moon.

Lunar Laser Ranging featured on the "Today" show
(11 February 2019)

NBC Sunday Today recently reported on lunar laser ranging activities at the APOLLO system in Sunspot NM.